Captain Bone Spurs Diagnosis Was Favor From Friend of Fred Trump

A Podiatrist Tenant of Fred Trump Avoid Helped ‘Don the Con’ Avoid Vietnam? Pictured is the sign of the actual doctor’s office in Jamaica, Queens. His daughters say he came to Trump’s aid with a diagnosis of bone spurs during the Vietnam draft.

President Donald Trump avoided military service in Vietnam because a Queens doctor did a “favor” for his father and diagnosed 22-year-old Donald with bone spurs in his heels.

The doctor, Larry Braunstein, died in 2007, but his daughters recently told The New York Times that their father frequently recalled coming to the aid of the Trump family during the Vietnam War in the late 1960s.

“I know it was a favor,” said Elysa Braunstein along with her sister, Sharon Kessel, in a report published on Wednesday. The two said that their father’s account implied that Trump did not suffer from the foot ailment that kept him out of the war.

“But did he examine him? I don’t know,” Elysa Braunstein added. Two years before being diagnosed with bone spurs, President Trump had been deemed available for conscription by the Selective Service System.

Larry Braunstein ran his practice for decades out of a building in Jamaica, Queens that was owned and operated by the president’s father, Fred Trump. The Trump family sold the building that housed Braunstein’s practice in 2004.

“What he got was access to Fred Trump,” Elysa Braunstein told the Times. “If there was anything wrong in the building, my dad would call and Trump would take care of it immediately. That was the small favor that he got.”

The Times did not find any paper evidence to corroborate the account of Larry Braunstein’s daughters.

The daughters also mentioned another doctor, Manny Weinstein, who they say was involved in diagnosing President Trump with bone spurs. Weinstein died in 1995, but records show he lived in two apartments owned by Fred Trump and moved into the first in 1968, the same year President Trump received his diagnosis and became exempt from serving in the war.

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